Japanese culture – Tohoho http://tohoho.info/ Fri, 13 May 2022 09:15:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tohoho.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Japanese culture – Tohoho http://tohoho.info/ 32 32 The Montreal Japanese Culture Festival brings a huge street food market to the Mile End https://tohoho.info/the-montreal-japanese-culture-festival-brings-a-huge-street-food-market-to-the-mile-end/ Wed, 11 May 2022 08:44:22 +0000 https://tohoho.info/the-montreal-japanese-culture-festival-brings-a-huge-street-food-market-to-the-mile-end/ YATAI MTL and Japan Week return to Montreal. The festivals, a celebration of Japanese culture, will showcase products and dishes from local businesses. There will even be a street food market. During Japan Week, from June 6 to 12, restaurants and stores in the Montreal area will present a “special Japanese street food menu and […]]]>

YATAI MTL and Japan Week return to Montreal. The festivals, a celebration of Japanese culture, will showcase products and dishes from local businesses. There will even be a street food market.

During Japan Week, from June 6 to 12, restaurants and stores in the Montreal area will present a “special Japanese street food menu and a diversified offer of Japanese products”, according to a press release. Participating restaurants will offer items as diverse as karaage, ramen, gyoza, barbecue, takoyaki, corndogs, sour plum beer, Japanese cheesecake, mochi, doroyaki, ice cream matcha and bubble tea.

Montrealers can also browse local stores for green teas, barware, cocktail syrups, kimonos, wrapping fabrics, flowers and artwork.

Then, for YATAI MTL, chefs and artisans will converge in the same place for a street market and merchant from June 10 to 12. The market will span the Marché des Possibles park and adjacent Entrepôt 77 in Mile End.

YATAI will also include live musical performances, joint whiskey tasting/ lost in translation a film screening at the Cinéma du Parc on June 9, an 80s-themed evening, a Shiba and Akita doggy party on June 11 and a Studio Ghibli film music concert on June 11 and 12.

Get the details on Japan Week and YATAI MTL below.

Person in a Montreal park with a Shiba Inu dog.

Courtesy of YATAI MTL

Price: Free participation

When:

  • Japan Week: June 6-12
  • YATAI MTL: June 10 to 12
    • street food and craft market:
      • Friday, June 10, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.
      • Saturday, June 11, 12 p.m. to 11 p.m.
      • Sunday, June 12, 12 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Or:

Japan Week: participating restaurants and shops throughout the city

YATAI MTL: Marché des Possibles and Warehouse 77, 77, rue Bernard E., Montreal, QC

Website

]]>
BSU Hosts Japanese Culture Appreciation Day https://tohoho.info/bsu-hosts-japanese-culture-appreciation-day/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 23:14:38 +0000 https://tohoho.info/bsu-hosts-japanese-culture-appreciation-day/ Exploring the intersections between black and Japanese culture, art and media MEDIA CONTACT: David Thompson, dlthompson@bowiestate.edu, 301-860-4311 (BOWIE, Md.) – Hoping to stoke the embers of Bowie State’s growing student interest in Japanese culture – particularly popular culture products related to anime and manga – Professor Horacio Sierra has planned the university’s first-ever Japanese Culture […]]]>

Exploring the intersections between black and Japanese culture, art and media

MEDIA CONTACT: David Thompson, dlthompson@bowiestate.edu, 301-860-4311

(BOWIE, Md.) – Hoping to stoke the embers of Bowie State’s growing student interest in Japanese culture – particularly popular culture products related to anime and manga – Professor Horacio Sierra has planned the university’s first-ever Japanese Culture Appreciation Day on Tuesday, April 26 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The day will include a panel on anime/manga/cosplay and black culture with BlerDCon CEO George Hilton and cosplayer Naomi “Afrococoapuffs” Nurse in addition to a presentation at the Japanese Embassy by Japanese diplomat Taichi Kaneshrio , educational consultant; a screening of Miyazaki’s My Neighbor Totoro, a 1988 Japanese animated fantasy film; and a Japanese lunch. See the full Japanese Culture Appreciation Day schedule.

Sierra, an associate professor in the Department of Language, Literature, and Cultural Studies (LL&CS), says students started the Japanese Culture Appreciation Club on campus in 2017. It was sponsored by one of the librarians, Fusako Ito, and the members hold monthly meetings to discuss Japanese. culture and showing Japanese films.

“Whenever you see students taking initiatives for cultural or academic benefit, you have to pay attention to it,” Sierra says. “It’s about allowing them to see the big picture, what they could do with what they learn in the classrooms.”

Several BSU courses complement this interest, including Graphic Novels, which covers manga aesthetics and its relationship to graphic novels; Storytelling for film and animation history, which discusses Japanese visual tropes and anime’s influence on black and hip-hop culture.

Sierra secured a $10,000 grant from the Japan-United States Friendship Commission (JUSFC) to fund the cultural appreciation event. JUSFC is an independent federal agency, and BSU is the first HBCU to receive a grant from the commission.

“If you look through the other grant recipients, Columbia and Brown and George Mason, we’re the first HBCU to receive one,” Sierra notes. “Universities they usually give to have Japanese study programs.”

Sierra said he would eventually like to have Japanese classes taught in BSU’s LL&CS department as another way to sustain student interest.

The JUSFC grant also funded a Zoom session for BSU students to learn more about the exchange program and teaching in Japan. Two black alumni of JET shared their experiences on how students can teach English in Japan after graduation.

Sierra hopes Japanese Culture Appreciation Day will broaden students’ cultural horizons to make them realize that Japan is not just a place for them to travel, “but it’s a place for them to work, a place for them to use their skills through NGOs or other opportunities.”

“It’s about giving students the connection, showing them the opportunity, like, ‘How do you do that?’, ‘Who do you network with?’ It’s a way to focus students’ attention while they’re busy trying to complete their coursework.

###

About Bowie State University
Bowie State University (BSU) is a leading portal to higher education for qualified individuals from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds seeking a high-quality, affordable, comprehensive public university. The university places special emphasis on science, technology, cybersecurity, teacher education, business, and nursing within the context of a liberal arts education. For more information on BSU, visit bowiestate.edu.

]]>
JSA Festival Brings Japanese Culture to EMU Campus https://tohoho.info/jsa-festival-brings-japanese-culture-to-emu-campus/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 12:10:20 +0000 https://tohoho.info/jsa-festival-brings-japanese-culture-to-emu-campus/ A version of this article in Japanese is available here. EMU’s Japanese Student Association (JSA) held a Japanese festival at Bowen Field House on Saturday, bringing Japanese culture to the EMU campus with performances such as kendo and judo demonstrations, activities such as origami and calligraphy, as well as popular Japanese dishes and snacks often […]]]>

A version of this article in Japanese is available here.

EMU’s Japanese Student Association (JSA) held a Japanese festival at Bowen Field House on Saturday, bringing Japanese culture to the EMU campus with performances such as kendo and judo demonstrations, activities such as origami and calligraphy, as well as popular Japanese dishes and snacks often served at festivals. .

The purpose of the festival was to raise awareness of Japanese culture and provide an opportunity for students interested in Japan to get engaged again, JSA President Joanne Martinez explained.

“It’s been difficult for a lot of students to engage more and learn more about Japanese culture,” Martinez said. “And that’s part of the experience of taking Japanese lessons. Japanese lessons [have been] online since COVID, so it’s a way to help them get engaged again and rekindle their interest in Japanese culture.

Popular Japanese festival dishes were served for free, including takoyaki or fried octopus balls, yakitori, a type of chicken skewer, and yakisoba noodles, which are thin stir-fried noodles with cabbage, carrots, ginger and beef, chicken or pork. .

Popular Japanese dishes were offered for free, including miso soup, takoyaki, gyoza, yakitori, and yakisoba noodles.

Origami, calligraphy and onigiri (rice dumpling) crafts were some of the activities on offer, giving festival-goers the chance to try out different aspects of traditional Japanese culture with hands-on experiences.

These hands-on experiences are central to JSA’s mission to bring Japanese culture to the EMU community. The JSA often holds events showing how different holidays are celebrated in Japan, JSA Secretary Tobias Bracken explained.

“It’s really interesting to experience a mini game of [Japanese culture]rather than just learning about it,” Bracken said.

In addition to free food and activities, five performances took place, offering insight into traditional and modern Japanese culture.

The Sakura Japanese Instrumental Group, a Michigan-based group that performs traditional Japanese music, was the first to perform. Using a variety of traditional instruments from Japan such as taiko drums, bamboo flutes and a koto, the group performed a beautiful series of traditional Japanese songs.

Japanese instrumental group Sakura performing traditional Japanese music at the 2022 JSA Japan Festival. The large stringed instrument is called a koto, which is an essential part of traditional Japanese music.

Spectators were then invited to participate in a Bon Odori dance, a traditional Japanese folk dance that was originally performed to welcome the spirits of ancestors.

Although Bon Odori has lost much of its religious significance, it is a popular staple of Obon, a festival held in summer in Japan where people appreciate their ancestors as they return to their hometowns.

Audience members participated in a Bon Odori dance, a popular feature of summer festivals in Japan.

A Kendo demonstration followed, performed by the EMU Kendo Club, showcasing the modern Japanese martial art derived from samurai sword fighting methods. Kendo was developed as a way to train with realistic combat without the risks of using real weapons.

The group, dressed in traditional Kendo armor, demonstrated a number of techniques and invited audience members to join them at the end, giving them a quick lesson in the fundamentals of Kendo.

EMU Kendo Club demonstrates the Japanese martial art of sword fighting.

Japanese pop culture was also showcased at the festival, with a performance by the ChiRi Girls, a Grand Rapids-based J-Pop cover band. The duo performed covers of iconic J-Pop songs like Suki and Tapioca Milk Tea.

ChiRi Girls, a Grand Rapids-based J-Pop cover duo, brought modern Japanese culture to the festival with their rendition of iconic J-Pop songs.

Finally, the festival ended with a judo demonstration, showcasing the skills and technique that is why judo is called “the soft way”. Judo is an unarmed martial art, and similar to Kendo, was developed to give students the opportunity to practice combat without risk of injury or death.

Judo involves upsetting your opponent’s balance, providing techniques to lift and throw them to the ground, where choke holds or knuckle locks are then applied to pin and control your opponent.

The EMU Judo Club performed a judo demonstration, showcasing techniques for throwing and turning your opponent to knock them to the ground, where more control can be exercised.

All EMU students are welcome to participate in JSA events and some are open to the public. For more information about the JSA, email JSA President Joanne Martinez at jmart152@emich.edu. For more information on the EMU Kendo Club, contact Charlie Kondek at charliekondek@gmail.com.


]]>
Japanese Culture Society Holds Campus Sumo Exhibition | News https://tohoho.info/japanese-culture-society-holds-campus-sumo-exhibition-news/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/japanese-culture-society-holds-campus-sumo-exhibition-news/ Dallas Sumo Club members demonstrate how to perform the koshiwari during a sumo wrestling demonstration on April 1 at the Maverick Activity Center. The Koshiwari is a wide version of the squat, often called a sumo squat. Photo by Alessandra Sara “Ishi! » ” Neither ! » “San! » Wearing a cowboy hat, Corey Morrison, […]]]>






Dallas Sumo Club members demonstrate how to perform the koshiwari during a sumo wrestling demonstration on April 1 at the Maverick Activity Center. The Koshiwari is a wide version of the squat, often called a sumo squat.



“Ishi! »

” Neither ! »

“San! »

Wearing a cowboy hat, Corey Morrison, founder of the Dallas Sumo Club, led a countdown in Japanese as his teammates stretched around in a black tawara and straw ring before their match .

The Japanese Cultural Society hosted the Dallas Sumo Club for a sumo wrestling demonstration Friday at the Maverick Activities Center. Sumo is a Japanese-style wrestling sport and the oldest combat sport in the world, Morrison said.

The Dallas Sumo Club was founded in January 2021 at the height of the pandemic, he said. Fortunately, the team was able to train at Kidd Springs Japanese Garden in Oak Cliff and 10th Planet Jiu Jitsu North Dallas in Carrollton.

The US Sumo Federation officially recognizes clubs in the Metroplex, Houston, San Antonio and Austin.

“One of our goals is to continue to develop[ing] the sport throughout DFW, but stays true to the traditions that make sumo great,” he said.







The Japanese Culture Society holds a sumo exhibition on campus

Plano resident Mike Hammond, 33, stretches before a sumo wrestling demonstration April 1 at the Maverick Activity Center. The US Sumo Federation recognizes clubs in the Metroplex, Houston, San Antonio and Austin.



Melanie Martinez, IT manager and president of the Japanese Culture Society, said the organization hosts events to expose people to culture.

“I think it’s good when people have a diverse view of everything, so they’re not quick to judge things,” Martinez said.

Participants who wanted to fight were asked to bring towels and spandex shorts, she said. The Dallas Sumo Club provided a sumo belt called mawashi.

Sumo has ties to Shintoism, an indigenous Japanese religion, to ensure a good harvest, Morrison said. The match begins when two wrestlers are crouched in the middle of the ring and collide.

He said the wrestler loses if the soles of his feet lift off the ground or if he steps out of the ring.

He and his group demonstrated the art behind sumo wrestling, from match procedures to learning special moves.

One move is called Tsuri-Dashi, which is used by lifting an opponent by the belt to throw them out of the ring.







The Japanese Culture Society holds a sumo exhibition on campus

A member of the Dallas Sumo Club ties his teammate’s belt before a sumo wrestling demonstration April 1 at the Maverick Activities Center. Sumo wrestlers wear belts called mawashi.



The gyoji, a Japanese expression for referee, shouted orders from outside the ring as two wrestlers ambled onto the mat.

“Kamat!

“Matta nashi! »

Kamaete is a Japanese phrase meaning “get ready” and matta nashi means “no false start”, according to Tachiai, a sumo news site. Both sentences indicate that a match is beginning.

With fists on the ground and hips raised, men of all sizes prepare to smack each other in the ring. Students filled the pews, gasping and cheering for the action.

After the limb demonstration, Morrison opened the floor for the students to try out the sport.







The Japanese Culture Society holds a sumo exhibition on campus

Arlington resident Johnathan Flowers, 33, left, grabs Fort Worth resident Stephen Pretto, 28, by the neck in an attempt to knock him down during a sumo wrestling demonstration April 1 at the center of Maverick activities. The Dallas Sumo Club was founded in January 2021.



Tobias Maiden, a freshman architecture student and member of the Japanese Culture Society, was one of the first to enter the ring.

Maiden, clad in his own mawashi, brawled with a member of the sumo club in the ring. He gathered all his strength, but his foot slipped out of the ring.

“I focused too much on the position of my feet and I lost,” he said. “But it was quite a fun experience.”

He walked away with a smile as his friends congratulated him.

“Sumo is alive and well and thriving around the world,” Morrison said. “But really, Texas is currently, for some reason, a hot spot for sumo, and we just want everyone to know that sumo is for everyone.”

@TaylorAC13

news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

]]>
South Koreans appreciate Japanese culture as bilateral ties remain strained https://tohoho.info/south-koreans-appreciate-japanese-culture-as-bilateral-ties-remain-strained/ Mon, 04 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/south-koreans-appreciate-japanese-culture-as-bilateral-ties-remain-strained/ SEOUL–Tense bilateral relations between South Korea and Japan barely appeared during the country’s recent bitter presidential election, which saw former Attorney General Yoon Suk-yeol emerges victorious. Yoon, of the main opposition People Power Party, never spoke of concrete solutions to the wartime, territorial and trade disputes between the two nations during the March 9 election […]]]>

SEOUL–Tense bilateral relations between South Korea and Japan barely appeared during the country’s recent bitter presidential election, which saw former Attorney General Yoon Suk-yeol emerges victorious.

Yoon, of the main opposition People Power Party, never spoke of concrete solutions to the wartime, territorial and trade disputes between the two nations during the March 9 election campaign.

His defeated opponent, Lee Jae-myung, who ran on the slate of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea, is known for his tough stance on Japan. However, the former governor of Gyeonggi Province rarely mentioned ties to Japan during his stump speeches.

Among young South Koreans, the troubled relationship between the two countries seems to have less influence on their consumption behavior.

GRAND DRAW FOR RYOKAN IN SOUTH KOREA

Tomonoya, a Japanese-style ryokan, opened last March in Gyeongju, the former capital of the Silla Kingdom in southeastern South Korea. The hostel is popular with guests, especially women in their 20s and 30s and families with children.

Tomonoya has earned a reputation for allowing customers to immerse themselves in Japanese culture in an Instagram-friendly, photogenic environment at a time when overseas travel remains difficult due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Installed in each of the 22 rooms of the ryokan, a Japanese-style bathtub with a bathtub made of cypress wood is the pride of the establishment.

The hostel ran out of room one weekday in late January when three university students, in casual ‘yukata’ kimonos, were seen taking photos outside the ryokan’s entrance.

“I really like Japanese culture and cuisine,” said 19-year-old Jho Eun, one of the three.

Tomonoya operator Lee Jin-woo, 35, worked for a major fashion industry company for eight years after graduating from college. He then became an entrepreneur.

Lee spent about a year studying the ryokan and hotels of Japan after an acquaintance told him that he would find an enthusiastic market among the public if he were to build Japanese-style hotels, of which there are none. had not in South Korea.

He raised funds from individual investors and took out loans to open the first hostel in the Tomonoya chain on the island of Geoje in the southeast of the country in 2019. He opened two more last year. last, including that of Gyeongju.

Lee said his ryokan operates at almost 100% occupancy every day and the majority of their guests have visited Japan on trips.

“Japan was the most common destination for South Koreans traveling abroad before the pandemic took hold,” he said. “Issues of shared history don’t come into play when it comes to tourist appeal.”

A Japanese-style bath with a tub made of cypress wood is seen in a room at the Tomonoya ryokan in Gyeongju, South Korea, on January 24. (Takuya Suzuki)

Lee said he thought young people had little opportunity in their daily lives to reflect on the history of Japan’s colonial rule over Korea, which lasted from 1910 to 1945.

Lee, a fan of Japanese TV series, has visited Japan many times. He started operating the ryokan because he had a positive impression of Japan.

Lee said he believes Japan and South Korea should cooperate on security issues because the two countries are in similar positions on North Korea’s nuclear and missile development programs and U.S. rivalry. -Chinese.

“We shouldn’t dwell on the past,” he said, lamenting strained bilateral relations.

But he also said he was skeptical of Tokyo’s position that issues of common history, including that of wartime Korean workers, have been “settled”.

Other young people of his generation seem to share a similar stance as Lee towards Japan. In fact, many young South Koreans participated in the boycott of Japanese goods in 2019 to protest Tokyo’s imposition of export restrictions.

LINES SEEN IN JAPANESE RESTAURANTS

At the same time, however, there is currently something of a boom in Japan, mostly among young people, as the pandemic drags on. Most weekends, queues form outside the famous tonkatsu (fried pork cutlet), ramen, and other Japanese-style restaurants in Seoul.

Nijimori Studio, a tourist establishment that opened last fall in Dongducheon, near Seoul, is another favorite in the same vein. The theme park, originally built as a drama film studio, is home to Japanese-style buildings and retro-style shops.

“The streets are clean in Japan, where there are also lots of good things to eat,” said a 31-year-old woman who rode around in a rented yukata at the theme park during a recent national holiday in late January. “I came here because I can’t go to Japan because of the pandemic.”

The woman, however, said that she had participated, for a time, in the boycott of Japanese products.

“It’s a different matter when it comes to issues of shared history and the territorial dispute,” she said. “Japan should admit (its responsibility) when and where it should.”

20220325-Koreans-3-L
Visitors throng the Japanese-style Nijimori Studio theme park in Dongducheon, South Korea on January 31. (Takuya Suzuki)

Parties including Seoul National University’s Asian Center released the results of a survey in January in which respondents were asked to choose from six diplomatic issues which ones the new president’s new government should focus on.

About 70% said he should focus on strengthening the alliance with the United States.

The lowest proportion of respondents, at just under 30%, said the next government should focus on restoring ties with Japan. This is likely a sign of the growing public indifference to sour relationships, which have become the norm.

Meanwhile, legal proceedings are underway in South Korea to convert the assets of Japanese companies in the country into cash, by selling them, in order to pay compensation to Korean wartime workers who have won court cases in the country. If such forced reparations were to become a reality, it “could catastrophically worsen bilateral relations”, a Japanese government official said.

If the escalating feud were to make headlines, young South Koreans who value Japanese culture and generally pay little attention to matters of shared history could turn on Japan at any moment.

At the same time, young South Koreans are also reflecting on the new bilateral relations they will create in their time.

“It’s certainly never easy to sort out the bilateral issues of a shared history,” Lee said. “If there are more opportunities to learn about each other’s nation’s culture, however, it will gradually help to deepen mutual understanding.” And I hope to play a role in this process to the extent possible. »

]]>
Cherry Blossom Festival to Honor Japanese Culture in Columbus and the State of Ohio https://tohoho.info/cherry-blossom-festival-to-honor-japanese-culture-in-columbus-and-the-state-of-ohio/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/cherry-blossom-festival-to-honor-japanese-culture-in-columbus-and-the-state-of-ohio/ Columbus will host its first-ever Cherry Blossom Festival Saturday through April 1, with an event hosted by the Japanese Student Organization at Ohio Union Sunday. Credit: Madison Kinner | Lantern Reporter As Columbus welcomes spring, it will also host its first-ever Cherry Blossom Festival, with events scheduled across the city and on the Ohio State […]]]>

Columbus will host its first-ever Cherry Blossom Festival Saturday through April 1, with an event hosted by the Japanese Student Organization at Ohio Union Sunday. Credit: Madison Kinner | Lantern Reporter

As Columbus welcomes spring, it will also host its first-ever Cherry Blossom Festival, with events scheduled across the city and on the Ohio State campus from Saturday through April 10.

The festival will celebrate Columbus’ cherry blossoms and the 10th anniversary of the gift of 20 cherry trees donated to the city by Japan during the 2012 Columbus Bicentennial Celebration, according to Experience Columbus’ website. The festival will be inspired by the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington DC, which honors the 110th anniversary of the mayor of Tokyo who donated cherry blossoms to the city, according to the national festival. websiteand.

Marlinda Iyer, president of the Columbus Festival and executive director of International Voluntary Organizations, said most of the festival’s events, such as performances and speakers, will take place in Franklin Park, where the cherry blossoms are. She said this festival is different from other festivals in Columbus because it will be a week-long, citywide event.

“We not only have it at the Adventure Center, but also at Ohio State University and Franklin Park Conservatory, and there are schools that are participating as well,” Iyer said.

On Sunday, the Ohio State Festival will take place in the Ohio Union Performance Hall from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and will be open to everyone with no tickets required for admission, Iyer said.

Led by the Japanese Student Organization, Sho Weinstein, a fourth-year chemical engineering student and president of the group, said hosting a cherry blossom festival in Columbus amid national cherry blossom events is an opportunity. exciting to honor Japanese culture locally.

“Cherry blossoms are Japanese cherry trees, so that’s a really big part of our culture as well, and we really want to highlight that for our event this year,” Weinstein said.

Weinstein said the Ohio State celebration will include booths, games and performances by the Japanese Student Organization and other Asian American Desi Pacific Island organizations such as J2K. He said Ohio State will also offer shuttles to and from Franklin Park.

“It’s going to be good, hopefully there will be a lot of traffic between that as well, so hopefully a few more people will come to our event because of that,” Weinstein said.

Although Ohio State will only participate in one day of the festival, Iyer said she hopes the rest of the festival and events — which will be hosted by other local schools — will encourage members of the community to get out and enjoy the outdoors and the cherry blossoms.

“I hope they will be drawn to the flowers, so that they come to visit it every year, and also realize that the frail, fleeting beauty of these spectacular flowers is a kind of life lesson, how life is short and you have to make the most of it,” Iyer said.

]]>
Cherry Blossom Festival Gives Students a Glimpse into Japanese Culture – WKUHerald.com https://tohoho.info/cherry-blossom-festival-gives-students-a-glimpse-into-japanese-culture-wkuherald-com/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/cherry-blossom-festival-gives-students-a-glimpse-into-japanese-culture-wkuherald-com/ Yuki Aono was one of the volunteers who held the cherry blossom event outside DSU on March 30. “I want to encourage students to visit Japan, to teach English in Japan. Economically,” she said. “Japan is a very good country and many Japanese companies are in Bowling Green. I want [students] learn Japanese very seriously. […]]]>

The WKU Japan Program held a Cherry Blossom Festival on Wednesday, March 30 under the pink flowering trees outside DSU. The event aimed to teach students about the importance of typical cherry blossoms in Japanese culture, as well as give them the chance to taste traditional Japanese cuisine prepared by four volunteers from Japan.

Cherry blossom viewings and celebrations are a common tradition in Japan. Paul Collins, Japanese teacher, explained why it is important that students in the Japanese program have the opportunity to participate in this tradition.

“In Japan, when the cherry trees are in bloom, they like to go out and enjoy the intricacies of nature,” Collins said. “The cherry blossoms here bloomed earlier this week. This allows students to see what a real cherry blossom viewing experience looks like, as well as interact with Japanese people.

Events like this allow students inside and outside language programs to experience the traditions of a different culture. Kaitlyn Morgan, a junior anthropology student, explained why these cultural events benefit students.

“It helps broaden your view of the world and also helps to understand other people,” Morgan said. “Communicating with others is so important and learning a language benefits from that; it’s also a good way to boost your resume.

Some students learn Japanese because of its commercial and economic application. There are a host of companies across the country that are based in Japan, including some in Bowling Green. Stephen Howard, a senior interdisciplinary studies student, explained this application of Japanese.

“We’re going to need people to be translators, a lot of them have come for things like video games or anime or other media, but there’s a business and a skill set that people may not know about- not be here [in Japanese]“, Howard said.

Yuki Aono is among the volunteers who helped organize the event. She is originally from Nagoya, Japan and worked as an English teacher before coming to Bowling Green. She now volunteers with the city’s refugee center and organizes various activities like this, such as judo classes and cartoon events.

“I think I can do something for Japanese learners here by organizing these events so that they can feel the real Japanese culture and traditions,” Aono said. “I want to encourage students to visit Japan, to teach English in Japan. Economically, Japan is a very good country, and many Japanese companies are in Bowling Green. I want [students] learn Japanese very seriously.

Journalist Alexandria Anderson can be reached at [email protected].

]]>
Tokyo teaches real Japanese culture and history https://tohoho.info/tokyo-teaches-real-japanese-culture-and-history/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/tokyo-teaches-real-japanese-culture-and-history/ Ghostwire: Tokyo is a fun action-packed adventure, but contains a surprising amount of detail regarding real Japanese culture. Ghostwire: Tokyo is a spiritual adventure filled with action, adventure and a startling level of detail that teaches real Japanese culture and history. The game is incredibly detailed, so much so that it almost looks like a […]]]>

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a fun action-packed adventure, but contains a surprising amount of detail regarding real Japanese culture.

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a spiritual adventure filled with action, adventure and a startling level of detail that teaches real Japanese culture and history. The game is incredibly detailed, so much so that it almost looks like a class in Japan, and its stunning environments only help with that. As players explore a Tokyo devoid of human life and haunted by malevolent visitors, they may find themselves ignoring the story and being content with whatever happens. Ghostwire: Tokyo must teach them the country.

In Ghostwire: Tokyo, a crazed cultist known as Hannya has shrouded Tokyo in a deadly fog that has wiped out all of its human inhabitants. Visitors, born out of their negative emotions, flooded the city. In order to defeat them and save his family, a survivor, named Akito, must defeat Hannya and close the gates between the physical and spiritual worlds. Ghostwire: Tokyo breaks away from the battles of other FPS games with a myriad of elemental powers and mystical artifacts. Even without it, however, it still feels gorgeous.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: Ghostwire: Tokyo – How To Unlock The Officer Outfit

All Ghostwire: TokyoThe details of, from the largest to the smallest, present Japan in a fascinating way. From ancient temples and historic monuments to clothes on the ground left behind by former human occupants, the game gives players a surprisingly accurate look at Tokyo and the people who inhabit it. Most games focus on combat mechanics and story telling, which ghost yarn it still does, but the amount of detail in its world (and the encyclopedic content locked away in its menus) sets it apart. For those curious or fascinated by Japan, it’s worth playing for that alone.


Ghostwire: Tokyo Presents Japanese Culture


In Ghostwire: Tokyo, famous landmarks such as Tokyo Tower and Shibuya Crossing are recreated in stunning detail. Although some of them have fictitious names for various reasons, they are still accurate renditions of some of Shibuya’s most famous sights. find more Ghostwire: TokyoJizo’s statues and shrines are themselves an accurate representation of Japan’s game-systems sprawl, but that’s just one of the reasons players explore the map and take in the stunning recreation of Tokyo that the game has to offer, which houses details at every turn. Even the clothes left behind by Tokyoites washed away by Hannya’s deadly fog, though a small detail, reflect the modern culture of the real city, often providing moments of environmental storytelling for those who take the time to look. .


ghost yarn also teaches players about Japan through its world building. The world is littered with little notes that, while not contributing to the game in any major way, still build the world and offer insight into the lives of its inhabitants. Shrine priests and ordinary citizens leave behind things like to-do lists or upcoming vacation lists. KK’s Investigation Notes, in addition to giving extra skill points, also build the lore and meaning of a real character by showing players Tokyo through his eyes. Players will need to get magatama Ghostwire: Tokyo in addition to these skill points for the best upgrades, but the ratings are worth pursuing for lore alone. His notes on the city’s various supernatural phenomena, like the Sewer Kid note, all show classic Japanese legends in a modern setting. KK’s sense of character is also emphasized through his banter with Akito, as the two occasionally discuss mundane topics through the lens of a generational divide, offering even more interesting cultural insights into the game’s environments.


However, perhaps the aspect of the game that showcases Japan and its culture the most are the encyclopedia entries that offer additional detail on just about everything. Whether it’s a big party or a regional specialty or a snack, Ghostwire: Tokyo offers in-depth explanations of nearly every detail of the game’s real-life counterparts. It’s in many ways a cultural history lesson about Japan, and while the little details don’t do anything to bolster the gameplay, they do go a long way to make the environment real. Ghostwire: Tokyo is an immersive supernatural experience worth playing, especially for anyone who loves Japan or wants to learn more about its culture.


Next: How Long Ghostwire: Tokyo Takes To Beat

Nintendo Switch Sports Tom Felton Matthew Lewis

Harry Potter stars reunite for Switch Sports release with unlikely team


About the Author

]]>
Malaysian Artists Explore Japanese Culture Through Hybrid Exhibition https://tohoho.info/malaysian-artists-explore-japanese-culture-through-hybrid-exhibition/ Mon, 28 Mar 2022 02:09:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/malaysian-artists-explore-japanese-culture-through-hybrid-exhibition/ What does the relationship between Malaysia and Japan look like in visual arts, moving images, performance, music and literature? Kaleidoscope Japan: online exhibition, which begins today, features the work of 13 Malaysian artists who reflect on their observations and hopes around Japan and its relationship with Malaysia, from a social and cultural perspective, as well […]]]>

What does the relationship between Malaysia and Japan look like in visual arts, moving images, performance, music and literature?

Kaleidoscope Japan: online exhibition, which begins today, features the work of 13 Malaysian artists who reflect on their observations and hopes around Japan and its relationship with Malaysia, from a social and cultural perspective, as well as the political and economic climate.

It is organized by The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

This month-long exhibition (March 28-April 24) is a hybrid presentation, including online and physical events.

It was supposed to be presented online, but with the recent easing of pandemic restrictions, new elements have been added to the exhibition.

AutoCAD drawing by Sabah-based contemporary artist Harold Egn Eswar, ‘Dari Pagalan Ke Motoyasu’. Photo: JFKL

In the online Obento Lunch Tour (featuring non-video works) and Oshaberi Supper Tour (video work), visitors can delve into the inspiration behind the work and explore each artist’s story. This series of events will take place online (Zoom and Facebook Live on the JFKL and Kaleidoscope Japan Facebook page).

Physical events include a 12-hour performance by Tung Jit Yang, Bryan Chang and Arief Hamizan at KongsiKL, starting April 16. EveryThoughtI’veEverHad: Contemplating the Origin of the Sunit will also be a virtual event on Twitch.

A screenshot of the video work A screenshot of Roopesh Sitharan and Katsuyuki Hattori’s “Bertemu Sogu” video work. Photo: JFKL

Each week will see different events and discussions around the theme of the exhibition, starting with Week 1: Pandang Ke Mana?, followed by Week 2: Identity, Week 3: Myth and Phenomenon, and Week 4: Memory spatial.

The other participating artists are Azzad Diah, Blankmalaysia, Dhan Illiani Yusof, Harold Reagan Eswar (Egn), Jun Ong, Katsuyuki Hattori, Linus Chung, Ridhwan Saidi, Roopesh Sitharan, Wong Xiang Yi and Yvonne Tan, as well as ANGQASA, a group of music project by Alvin Seah that explores ambient and post-rock soundscapes, and the multidisciplinary art collective Shaman Tearoom (Aiwei Foo and Kent Lee).

The exhibition is curated by Low Pey Sien. Trained as an architect, she organized Di Situ: an exhibition in 2021 as part of the Curatorial Workshop 2020 organized by The Japan Foundation, Kuala Lumpur.

More info here.

]]>
Tea Time Friday gives Huskers the chance to relax and enjoy Japanese culture | Nebraska today https://tohoho.info/tea-time-friday-gives-huskers-the-chance-to-relax-and-enjoy-japanese-culture-nebraska-today/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/tea-time-friday-gives-huskers-the-chance-to-relax-and-enjoy-japanese-culture-nebraska-today/ Chai. Earl Grey. Caramel. Whatever your tea choice, the Kawasaki Reading Room invites everyone to try new flavors and connect with Japanese culture as part of its weekly Tea Time Friday program. Every Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Huskers can pick up flavored tea and a snack outside the doors of the Reading […]]]>

Chai. Earl Grey. Caramel.

Whatever your tea choice, the Kawasaki Reading Room invites everyone to try new flavors and connect with Japanese culture as part of its weekly Tea Time Friday program.

Every Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Huskers can pick up flavored tea and a snack outside the doors of the Reading Room, located on the third floor of the Jackie Gaughan Multicultural Center. Members of the campus community have the option of stopping quickly for tea or staying longer and exploring the quiet study space of the reading room, craft workshops or more than 7 000 books on Japanese culture, history and language.

Reading Room Manager Madoka Wayoro encourages all students, whether they’re studying Japanese or have Japanese heritage, to try Tea Time Friday. And while she hopes the Huskers will explore the resources of the reading room in addition to having tea, she mostly hopes they’ll feel comfortable enough to relax there.

“They’re so stressed and struggling with classes,” Wayoro said, “but I want this place to be a safe place for people to drop by, relax, talk to me if they need to.”

Some students, Wayoro observed, started coming at teatime on Friday for a weekly treat, but ended up staying longer to make new friends or get involved in the reading room. Joe Vlach, an economics graduate, has been trying new flavors every Friday since freshman year.

“My favorite part of Tea Time Friday is its low-key atmosphere,” Vlach said. “Some days I talk a lot and play games with friends; other days I’ll relax and read a book. The ability to do something different every week while enjoying the same atmosphere is what, in my opinion, makes Tea Time Friday truly unique.

Once Vlach became addicted to the weekly event, he further explored the venue’s resources by teaching himself Japanese from a textbook. The Japanese language is one of his strongest passions now, and he says it has given him countless opportunities.

As the semester continues, Wayoro has many plans in mind to welcome students for tea time. On March 4, she is hosting a celebration for Hinamatsuri, or Japanese Girl’s Day, and will feature tea and an essential oil blending activity. She also hopes to start offering students the opportunity to enjoy brewed tea together in person, which has not been possible due to the covid-19 pandemic.

Whatever the future, Wayoro hopes students will see value in attending.

“It’s just a place where students can come and relax, like an oasis in the desert,” Wayoro said.

]]>