Japanese film – Tohoho http://tohoho.info/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 13:24:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tohoho.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-25-120x120.png Japanese film – Tohoho http://tohoho.info/ 32 32 Japanese Film, Music Festival in Chennai Nov 25-27 https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-music-festival-in-chennai-nov-25-27/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 11:16:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-music-festival-in-chennai-nov-25-27/ Chennai, November 16 (UNI) The Japan Film and Music Festival will be held here from November 25 to 27 to commemorate the 70th anniversary diplomatic relations between Japan and India The Japan Foundation, in association with the Embassy of Japan in India and PVR Cinemas (Venue Partner), will organize the Fest at PVR SPI Escape, […]]]>

Chennai, November 16 (UNI) The Japan Film and Music Festival will be

held here from November 25 to 27 to commemorate the 70th anniversary

diplomatic relations between Japan and India

The Japan Foundation, in association with the Embassy of Japan in

India and PVR Cinemas (Venue Partner), will organize the Fest

at PVR SPI Escape, Express Avenue Mall in the city.

Tickets can be reserved through PVR Cinemas and BookMyShow.

This year’s festival will feature concerts recorded by RADWIMPS,

one of Japan’s leading rock bands followed by projections of iconic

animated films from the world famous filmmaker and animator

Makoto Shinkai, said a statement from the Japan Foundation today.

RADWIMPS is a famous Japanese rock band formed in 2001 and

received the Japanese Academy Award for Best Original

Score, to compose the soundtracks of record animations

feature films like “Your Name”. and “Weathering With You”, produced

by world-renowned animator and filmmaker Makoto Shinkai.

Speaking about the festival, Koji Sato, General Manager of Japan

The New Delhi Foundation said India and Japan had shared a close bond

relationship, encompassing not only trade and economic ties, but

also cultural exchanges.

“In our contemporary culture, music and films are shared and

appreciated by the general public, making us feel much closer,” he said.

“In this momentous year of friendship, we bring to Chennai a

true slice of Japanese entertainment; helping friends make them happy

moments and memories across the country,” he added.

The festival will feature a recorded concert by RADWIMPS from

their world premiere of “Forever in the Daze Tour 2021-2022”

with the “Your Name. Orchestral Concert”.

The Japan Film and Music Festival will also present Makoto

Shinkai’s anime films, including “Weathering With You”,

“Your name.”, “The garden of words”, “Children who hunt

Lost Voices”, “5 centimeters per second” and “The Place

Promised at our beginnings”.

“Your name.” was not only a critical success, but became the

third highest-grossing animated film of all time, worldwide,

with international box office receipts exceeding the US dollar

330 million.

“Weathering With You”, Makoto Shinkai’s latest film received

critical and commercial success around the world. it was japan

official entry to the Oscar for best international feature film

Film.

UNI GV 1630

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Koji Fukada Dedicates Kurosawa Prize to Struggling Japanese Film Workers | New https://tohoho.info/koji-fukada-dedicates-kurosawa-prize-to-struggling-japanese-film-workers-new/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 16:45:13 +0000 https://tohoho.info/koji-fukada-dedicates-kurosawa-prize-to-struggling-japanese-film-workers-new/ Filmmakers Koji Fukada and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu each received an honorary Kurosawa Akira award at the Tokyo International Film Festival on Saturday (October 29) and donated proceeds to support talent. The Japanese Fukada is known for having directed feature films such as the title of the Venice competition Love lifewinner of the 2016 Cannes Jury […]]]>

Filmmakers Koji Fukada and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu each received an honorary Kurosawa Akira award at the Tokyo International Film Festival on Saturday (October 29) and donated proceeds to support talent.

The Japanese Fukada is known for having directed feature films such as the title of the Venice competition Love lifewinner of the 2016 Cannes Jury Prize Un Certain Regard Harmoniumand the title of the Locarno 2019 competition A missing girl. But he’s also a well-known activist who campaigns on behalf of independent filmmakers in Japan and has used his TIFF platform to draw attention to ongoing struggles in the industry.

“I grew up watching films by masters like Kurosawa, Ozu, Mizoguchi and Naruse, then went to film school,” he said as he accepted the honorary award at a black-tie event at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. “There was a golden age of cinema in Japan, and during that time directors and crew were hired by the studios and their livelihoods were guaranteed.

“When I started working in 2000, the studio system had collapsed and the stability of the industry had been lost. Everyone was working as a freelancer. After 2000 budgets started to come down and we all had to live in a time of great instability. Then in 2020, the pandemic hit us all, including members of the film industry. Cinemas, too, were faced with the decision to close, due to the situation Many actors have taken their own lives, many are out of work, and we need to think about ways to protect those working in the industry.

“There is also the pressing issue of harassment, mental health and other serious situations in the film industry that we now recognize thanks to whistleblowers. We couldn’t wait for a legal safety net, so we have established our own organization called Arts Workers Japan which is funded by donations and is in danger of closing. Since I received the award primarily for my activism, I would like to donate my award money to this vital service continues.

Arts Workers Japan was launched last year as a national network to support people working in culture and the arts. Fukada, who also highlighted the ‘difficult environment for young filmmakers’ in Japan during an onstage conversation at TIFF, will donate 1 million yen (£5,800) which comes with the Kurosawa Prize to the organisation.

Inarritu donates to the scholarship

Mexican filmmaker Inarritu will also donate his award to the ReconoceR Fellowship, which he co-founded with the University of Monterrey to help cover tuition and housing costs for young Mexican and Central American immigrants living in the United States.

The Oscar-winning director of The Revenant, Birdman and babel recalled how TIFF finances helped advance his career. “My relationship with Tokyo began 22 years ago, when I arrived at TIFF with Love Perros“said Inarritu. “I won two prizes and received $100,000 in cash, which changed everything for me.

“Seven years later, I came to shoot part of the film babel and lived here for five months. It was one of the most amazing experiences I’ve ever had as a filmmaker and one of the happiest experiences of my life. Then I was invited to be president of the jury in 2009.

“My relationship with Japanese culture has been very deep, from music to literature to cinema. To receive this award in the name of the master of masters, the god of the temple of cinema, who has had a profound influence on all other filmmakers, is such an honor.

The honorary awards marked the first time the Kurosawa Akira Prize had been awarded in 14 years. The award is given to filmmakers who make extraordinary contributions to world cinema and who are expected to help define the future of the film industry. Past recipients are Steven Spielberg, Yamada Yoji and Hou Hsiao Hsien.

Inarritu had arrived from New York the night before and screened his latest feature film, Bardo, false chronicle of a handful of truthsin the TIFF gala selection.

The three Kurosawa films he named in terms of importance to him were Rashomon, Ran and Seven Samurai while Fukada said his favorite Kurosawa feature was the 1970s Dodes’ka-den.

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Quality of Japanese films on the rise, says Tokyo Film Festival program director https://tohoho.info/quality-of-japanese-films-on-the-rise-says-tokyo-film-festival-program-director/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 11:09:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/quality-of-japanese-films-on-the-rise-says-tokyo-film-festival-program-director/ The bold claim from the organizers of the Tokyo International Film Festival is that this year’s all-in-person edition is not only bigger than before, but also better. This applies at the organizational level as the festival adds more screens and foreign participants after the COVID interruption. This also applies to the quality of the film, […]]]>

The bold claim from the organizers of the Tokyo International Film Festival is that this year’s all-in-person edition is not only bigger than before, but also better.

This applies at the organizational level as the festival adds more screens and foreign participants after the COVID interruption. This also applies to the quality of the film, explains programming director Ichiyama Shozo. Variety.

Please summarize the highlights of your selection this year.

This year we had more films submitted than last year, and I was confident we could get a stronger lineup, which included seven world premieres and one international premiere. A happy surprise is Bui Thac Chuyen’s “Glorious Ashes”, which is the first Vietnamese film in our main competition in the history of the Tokyo International Film Festival.

We have three Japanese films in our main competition, up from two last year. The quality of submitted Japanese films is much higher than last year.

What was the thought behind choosing “Fragments of the Last Will” as this year’s opening film?

The main reason I chose “Fragments of the Last Will” is that it’s directed by Zeze Takahisa, who I think is one of the most important Japanese filmmakers. Zeze started his career as an independent filmmaker, then started working with major studios. But he continues to make independent films outside the studios, such as his masterpiece “Heaven’s Story”, which won the FIPRESCI prize in Berlin in 2011. “Fragments of the Last Will” is a commercial film, produced by a major television network, but it contains a strong anti-war message and showcases Zeze’s cinematic style.

You have 10 Asian world premieres in Asian Future. How was the relationship between this section and Filmex established?

The programmer, Kenji Ishizaka, head of Asian Future, gives priority to films that have not screened at any other film festival. The result is that all Asian Future films are world premieres. Meanwhile, Tokyo Filmex does not require premiere status. Its competition section favors young filmmakers, including those whose films have screened elsewhere, such as Cannes, Locarno and Venice. The upshot is that if you’re in Tokyo at the end of October, you can watch most of the best Asian films from young filmmakers made that year.

TIFF succeeded in scheduling a mainland Chinese film in Asian Future. It is increasingly rare. What is your understanding of the problem?

I’m disappointed that I couldn’t find a Chinese film for the main competition this year. It is very strange that mainland Chinese submissions are very few this year. I don’t know the reason. People in China say that many films are waiting for government permission to show the films in international film festivals, but the [regulatory] committee is not functioning properly. “The Cord of Life”, which was shot in Inner Mongolia, is the only Chinese film [we have] This year. It was submitted early and already had screening permission when we sent out the invite. I hope this strange situation will change and we can have more Chinese films next year.

TIFF has a large contingent of Japanese films. What current trends, strengths and weaknesses of comics in Japanese cinema do you discern based on what was submitted to the festival for consideration?

Last year, I had a problem finding Japanese films that I would like to present at the Tokyo festival. And we have not programmed any Japanese films in the Gala Selection in 2021. This year, the situation has changed radically, and we have received many more good Japanese films. I was able to select five Japanese films in the Gala Selection, and three in the main competition.

Some studios and production companies were reluctant to release their films during the pandemic, but this year they are very active in producing and releasing films. Three Japanese films in competition show that there are promising young independent filmmakers who can compete in major competitive film festivals in the near future. Even in Nippon Cinema Now, the non-competitive sidebar for new Japanese films, I was able to select several strong Japanese films from new filmmakers, which might have deserved some competition. An example is “Lightening Over Beyond,” a black-and-white epic, directed by Hanno Yoshihiro, who is best known as a music composer for films by Hou Hsiao-hsien and Jia Zhang-ke. The film is completely independent, made outside of any studio or television broadcaster, but the scale is much larger than most Japanese independent films. It’s very encouraging that such a courageous film is made independently of the Japanese production system.

Why revive the Kurosawa Prize now?

It was Hiroyasu Ando, ​​the president of the festival, who decided to revive the Kurosawa Award. He thinks the festival should have these kinds of honorary awards given to filmmakers who have contributed to film culture. I also think it’s great that the festival has an award named after a top filmmaker, because that can encourage the winners. And I know that the selection committee prefers to give these awards to filmmakers who are still in business, rather than those who are in the last stage of their career.

Cannes resists Netflix. Venice embraces him. How does streaming affect TIFF selection?

The reason Cannes doesn’t show Netflix movies is simply because of the cinema law in France, which sets a very long waiting period after a movie can go from theatrical release to streaming. There is no such law in Italy or Japan, and we are not limited to showing films produced by streaming platforms. For us, to select a film, the most important thing is whether it has a cinematic style or not. It doesn’t matter if the movie is produced by a movie studio or not. We will select films as long as they have not already been released on a streaming platform before the start of the festival.

In addition to feature films, last year I created a new “TIFF Series” section, which presents series produced by television channels or streaming platforms. This selected series made by filmmakers. I think this section should be expanded in the future, as many talented filmmakers are currently working on such series.

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Review of “Plan 75”: a Japanese film accuses us of not respecting the elderly https://tohoho.info/review-of-plan-75-a-japanese-film-accuses-us-of-not-respecting-the-elderly/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/review-of-plan-75-a-japanese-film-accuses-us-of-not-respecting-the-elderly/ Who can forget Jonathan Swift’s ‘A Modest Proposal’, that cheeky work of early 18th century satire in which the author had the nerve to suggest cannibalism as a means of keeping Ireland’s unwanted children “from to be a burden on their parents or their country, and to make them beneficial to the public”? In “Plan […]]]>

Who can forget Jonathan Swift’s ‘A Modest Proposal’, that cheeky work of early 18th century satire in which the author had the nerve to suggest cannibalism as a means of keeping Ireland’s unwanted children “from to be a burden on their parents or their country, and to make them beneficial to the public”? In “Plan 75”, first director Chie Hayakawa offers an equally extreme idea without the slightest glimmer of irony, and the suggestion is sufficiently heartbreaking so that audiences will likely still quote it decades later.Set in the near future in Japan, where it’s a surplus of old people – versus an abundance of babies – that causes problems, this chilling social drama takes its name hypothetical new legislation whereby an overtaxed government offers its elderly citizens an incentive to euthanize.

The candidates, who must be at least 75 years old, will be offered a modest compensation to smooth their exit, or pass on to their offspring. In the meantime, they can presumably be reassured that they are no longer a burden on society. It’s a grimly pragmatic way of looking at old age that Hayakawa doesn’t subscribe to: she’s too empathetic a director to insist on her idea actually being implemented, which “Plan 75” makes clear by following this experience of thought to its natural point. conclusion.

Hayakawa approaches his subject with absolute seriousness from the opening scene, which picks up just after a gunman opens fire on a nursing home – an extreme sign that public sentiment has turned against the country’s elders. that drain resources. Getting down to the nitty-gritty, so to speak, the helmsman aims to anticipate the logistics (how the deed is done, from the upstream counseling phone calls to the death rooms where the patients are gassed), as well as any real – global repercussions that his proposal would have.

Such a law would surely create new jobs, she believes. It might even spawn an entire industry of dying with dignity — sayonara vacations or resorts where the elderly can cash in their allowances for a comfortable death. But who would take those jobs? What happens to the things of the dead? Could companies be trusted to properly handle corpses? (Many funeral homes don’t do this now, and people are still taking shortcuts in government work.) Perhaps most troubling: if the public accepts Plan 75, would it ease subsequent iterations where is the minimum age lowered?

These are all compelling questions, though Hiyakawa rushes past the most obvious: Would Japan – or any country – really adopt a program like Plan 75? Presenting this premise as a fait accompli is the only thing that qualifies this film as sci-fi; the rest is a kind of wistful realism, as Hiyakawa focuses on how many elders are already abused: abandoned by loved ones, ignored by social services, left to fend for themselves.

At 78, Michi (Baishô Chieko) has reached the age where she should be able to relax and enjoy her sunset years. Instead, no one will rent an apartment to someone that old, and she struggles to find a job to cover basic living expenses. Tapping into a sort of collective guilt (as if Michi were real and the audience was responsible for her fate), Hiyakawa shows this nice old woman in one of those neon orange vests, reduced to directing traffic in the cold. Things aren’t much easier for Maria (Stefanie Arianne), the sweet Filipino nurse and young mother who assists Michi through the process. The world can be cruel and lonely, Hiyakawa reminds, while embracing the small but important reasons for living, like the bond that forms between these two characters.

Another client, widower Yukio (Takao Taka), is less apprehensive about the program. He feels he has lived well and seems ready to rejoin his wife. But something unexpected happens during his preliminary interview: Yukio’s handler is none other than his nephew Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), whom he hasn’t seen in years. For good reason, Hiromu is forced to recuse himself, since the encounter makes him worry about Yukio’s well-being. A few days later, behind his employer’s back, Hiromu tries to dissuade his uncle from his decision. Cue the sad trombone when it comes too late to save the man’s life.

“Plan 75” might have been a laughable exercise in emotional manipulation if it weren’t for the sensitive tone with which Hiyakawa approaches all of his characters. The film’s underlying agenda is hardly subtle, and yet Hiyakawa leaves more than enough room for audiences to disagree, i.e. to consider the actual merits of deciding of the time and means of his own exit. Although it remains taboo in many cultures, many people are already choosing to die by assisted suicide (Jean-Luc Godard being a recent example and Alain Delon having revealed his intention). Yet it is something quite different for a society to encourage it.

As depressing as his film can sometimes be, Hiyakawa isn’t quite as brutal as the professional miserabilist Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Still, if “Plan 75” – which depicts Japan’s submission to the international Oscar race – gets an over-enthusiastic reception in the United States, that can only encourage him to do more wet-cover drama, while this are the reflections of the sun that redeem the film. She should cling to it like some of her characters do to life itself.

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Review of “Plan 75”: a Japanese film accuses us of not respecting the elderly https://tohoho.info/review-of-plan-75-a-japanese-film-accuses-us-of-not-respecting-the-elderly-2/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/review-of-plan-75-a-japanese-film-accuses-us-of-not-respecting-the-elderly-2/ Who can forget Jonathan Swift’s ‘A Modest Proposal’, that cheeky work of early 18th century satire in which the author had the nerve to suggest cannibalism as a means of keeping Ireland’s unwanted children “from to be a burden on their parents or their country, and to make them beneficial to the public”? In “Plan […]]]>

Who can forget Jonathan Swift’s ‘A Modest Proposal’, that cheeky work of early 18th century satire in which the author had the nerve to suggest cannibalism as a means of keeping Ireland’s unwanted children “from to be a burden on their parents or their country, and to make them beneficial to the public”? In “Plan 75”, first director Chie Hayakawa offers an equally extreme idea without the slightest glimmer of irony, and the suggestion is sufficiently heartbreaking so that audiences will likely still quote it decades later.Set in the near future in Japan, where it’s a surplus of old people – versus an abundance of babies – that causes problems, this chilling social drama takes its name hypothetical new legislation whereby an overtaxed government offers its elderly citizens an incentive to euthanize.

The candidates, who must be at least 75 years old, will be offered a modest compensation to smooth their exit, or pass on to their offspring. In the meantime, they can presumably be reassured that they are no longer a burden on society. It’s a grimly pragmatic way of looking at old age that Hayakawa doesn’t subscribe to: she’s too empathetic a director to insist on her idea actually being implemented, which “Plan 75” makes clear by following this experience of thought to its natural point. conclusion.

Hayakawa approaches his subject with absolute seriousness from the opening scene, which picks up just after a gunman opens fire on a nursing home – an extreme sign that public sentiment has turned against the country’s elders. that drain resources. Getting down to the nitty-gritty, so to speak, the helmsman aims to anticipate the logistics (how the deed is done, from the upstream counseling phone calls to the death rooms where the patients are gassed), as well as any real – global repercussions that his proposal would have.

Such a law would surely create new jobs, she believes. It might even spawn an entire industry of dying with dignity — sayonara vacations or resorts where the elderly can cash in their allowances for a comfortable death. But who would take those jobs? What happens to the things of the dead? Could companies be trusted to properly handle corpses? (Many funeral homes don’t do this now, and people are still taking shortcuts in government work.) Perhaps most troubling: if the public accepts Plan 75, would it ease subsequent iterations where is the minimum age lowered?

These are all compelling questions, though Hiyakawa rushes past the most obvious: Would Japan – or any country – really adopt a program like Plan 75? Presenting this premise as a fait accompli is the only thing that qualifies this film as sci-fi; the rest is a kind of wistful realism, as Hiyakawa focuses on how many elders are already abused: abandoned by loved ones, ignored by social services, left to fend for themselves.

At 78, Michi (Baishô Chieko) has reached the age where she should be able to relax and enjoy her sunset years. Instead, no one will rent an apartment to someone that old, and she struggles to find a job to cover basic living expenses. Tapping into a sort of collective guilt (as if Michi were real and the audience was responsible for her fate), Hiyakawa shows this nice old woman in one of those neon orange vests, reduced to directing traffic in the cold. Things aren’t much easier for Maria (Stefanie Arianne), the sweet Filipino nurse and young mother who assists Michi through the process. The world can be cruel and lonely, Hiyakawa reminds, while embracing the small but important reasons for living, like the bond that forms between these two characters.

Another client, widower Yukio (Takao Taka), is less apprehensive about the program. He feels he has lived well and seems ready to rejoin his wife. But something unexpected happens during his preliminary interview: Yukio’s handler is none other than his nephew Hiromu (Hayato Isomura), whom he hasn’t seen in years. For good reason, Hiromu is forced to recuse himself, since the encounter makes him worry about Yukio’s well-being. A few days later, behind his employer’s back, Hiromu tries to dissuade his uncle from his decision. Cue the sad trombone when it comes too late to save the man’s life.

“Plan 75” might have been a laughable exercise in emotional manipulation if it weren’t for the sensitive tone with which Hiyakawa approaches all of his characters. The film’s underlying agenda is hardly subtle, and yet Hiyakawa leaves more than enough room for audiences to disagree, i.e. to consider the actual merits of deciding of the time and means of his own exit. Although it remains taboo in many cultures, many people are already choosing to die by assisted suicide (Jean-Luc Godard being a recent example and Alain Delon having revealed his intention). Yet it is something quite different for a society to encourage it.

As depressing as his film can sometimes be, Hiyakawa isn’t quite as brutal as the professional miserabilist Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Still, if “Plan 75” – which depicts Japan’s submission to the international Oscar race – gets an over-enthusiastic reception in the United States, that can only encourage him to do more wet-cover drama, while this are the reflections of the sun that redeem the film. She should cling to it like some of her characters do to life itself.

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Film Choices: Cartoons Underground, Japanese Film Festival, Singapore Korean Film Festival https://tohoho.info/film-choices-cartoons-underground-japanese-film-festival-singapore-korean-film-festival/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 02:55:48 +0000 https://tohoho.info/film-choices-cartoons-underground-japanese-film-festival-singapore-korean-film-festival/ Launched in 1983, one of Singapore’s oldest country film festivals is back. After two years of hybrid screenings, this year marks its return to cinema only. The festival is presented by the Japan Creative Centre, the Japanese Embassy in Singapore and the Japan Foundation, in collaboration with the Singapore Film Society. Among the 31 titles […]]]>

Launched in 1983, one of Singapore’s oldest country film festivals is back. After two years of hybrid screenings, this year marks its return to cinema only. The festival is presented by the Japan Creative Centre, the Japanese Embassy in Singapore and the Japan Foundation, in collaboration with the Singapore Film Society.

Among the 31 titles on the program is the Tsukamoto Horror Showcase (M18, 95 minutes, Friday, 7 p.m.). This collection features two low-budget shorts from horror master Shinya Tsukamoto, a filmmaker whose techno-fetish nightmares expressed in Tetsuo: The Iron Man (1989) had the world sit up and take notice.

In the short film Haze (2005, 49 minutes), a man played by Tsukamoto finds himself trapped in a concrete cell without knowing how he got there. Locked away with him are visions of hell. In the surreal short film L’Aventure From Denchu-Kozo (1987, 46 minutes), a boy with a power pole protruding from his body travels back in time to a future where cyborg vampires roam.

Where: Shaw Theaters Lido, Levels 5 & 6 Shaw House, 350 Orchard Road; Projector X: Picturehouse, 05-01 The Cathay, 2 Handy Road; and Oldham Theatre, 1 Canning Rise
MRT: Orchard; Dhoby Ghaut; City hall
When: Until November 5, various times
Tickets: From $10, with discounts
Information: https://str.sg/wHCi

Singapore Korean Film Festival 2022

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Japanese Film Festival returns to Vietnam https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-festival-returns-to-vietnam/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 00:13:04 +0000 https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-festival-returns-to-vietnam/ A total of eight unique films on various topics will be shown during this year’s festival, all of which are realistic depictions of colorful life from Japanese-style camera angles and limitless creativity, expressing the unique worldview of filmmakers from the Far Eastern country. Films to be screened include anime “Poupelle of Chimeney Town” directed by […]]]>

A total of eight unique films on various topics will be shown during this year’s festival, all of which are realistic depictions of colorful life from Japanese-style camera angles and limitless creativity, expressing the unique worldview of filmmakers from the Far Eastern country.

Films to be screened include anime “Poupelle of Chimeney Town” directed by Yusuke Hirota, anime “Blue Thermal” by Masaki Tachibana, drama “And So The Baton Is Passed” by Tetsu Maeda, “Blue” by Yoshida Keisuke , Masaaki Yuasa’s anime “INU -OH”, Yoshino Kohei’s live-action “Anime Supremacy”, Takahisa ZEZE’s drama “In the wake”, and Yoshida Keisuke’s drama “Intolerance”.

The return of the Japanese film festival this year will open new opportunities for Vietnamese audiences to access Japanese cinema, especially for moviegoers. Last year, the event was held virtually due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The festival according to this year’s schedule will be held in four major cities, including Ho Chi Minh City from Oct. 21-30, Hai Phong from Nov. 4-6, Hanoi from Nov. 11-20 and Da Nang from Nov. 25. to November 27.

Source: VOV

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Adventurous Japanese film at the heart of Theater Gigante’s ‘A Page of Madness’ https://tohoho.info/adventurous-japanese-film-at-the-heart-of-theater-gigantes-a-page-of-madness/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 14:41:27 +0000 https://tohoho.info/adventurous-japanese-film-at-the-heart-of-theater-gigantes-a-page-of-madness/ The Southern California film industry spends huge amounts of money trying to transport audiences to other worlds of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Heroic doses of time and energy are poured into complex constructs of production design, lighting, computer animation and more. This month, Theater Gigante proves that the only things really needed for this […]]]>

The Southern California film industry spends huge amounts of money trying to transport audiences to other worlds of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Heroic doses of time and energy are poured into complex constructs of production design, lighting, computer animation and more.

This month, Theater Gigante proves that the only things really needed for this sort of thing are incredibly cool drums, a great voice, and an old movie that’s barely survived nearly 100 years. Japanese performer Nanako Yamauchi greets the audience with fluid grace. She is there to provide live narration at Gigante’s presentation of Teinosuke Kinugasa’s 1926 film A page of madness. Yamauchi’s voice carries an emotional resonance throughout the silent film. Elegantly spoken words from across the planet are fused with percussion as composer Frank Pahl creates a rich audio atmosphere for the projection with cymbals, drums and bells and more performed by Little Bang Theory .

Kinugasa’s story tumbles through human misfortune. A man is a janitor in the mental institution where his wife is being treated. Kinugasa pushes the film through the camera with a hard burn of inner turmoil that leaves a breathtakingly expressionistic residue of movement and emotion on screen. Everyone in the story is marked in some way. Little Bang Theory weaves its supple and intricate path through an awe-inspiringly textured soundscape that comes vividly to life through Yamauchi’s words. New diction and new sounds dance with images from the distant past in the immediacy of the Kenilworth 508 Theatre. Too quickly, it passes and the Gigante Theater moves on.


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Presentation by the Gigante Theater of A page of madness only lasted a week. His next show stars Michael Stebbins in Will Eno’s Title and deed 18 Nov-Dec 3. For more information, visit theatregigante.org.

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Adventurous Japanese film at the heart of Theater Gigante’s ‘A Page of Madness’ https://tohoho.info/adventurous-japanese-film-at-the-heart-of-theater-gigantes-a-page-of-madness-2/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/adventurous-japanese-film-at-the-heart-of-theater-gigantes-a-page-of-madness-2/ The Southern California film industry spends huge amounts of money trying to transport audiences to other worlds of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Heroic doses of time and energy are poured into complex constructs of production design, lighting, computer animation and more. This month, Theater Gigante proves that the only things really needed for this […]]]>

The Southern California film industry spends huge amounts of money trying to transport audiences to other worlds of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Heroic doses of time and energy are poured into complex constructs of production design, lighting, computer animation and more.

This month, Theater Gigante proves that the only things really needed for this sort of thing are incredibly cool drums, a great voice, and an old movie that’s barely survived nearly 100 years. Japanese performer Nanako Yamauchi greets the audience with fluid grace. She is there to provide live narration at Gigante’s presentation of Teinosuke Kinugasa’s 1926 film A page of madness. Yamauchi’s voice carries an emotional resonance throughout the silent film. Elegantly spoken words from across the planet are fused with percussion as composer Frank Pahl creates a rich audio atmosphere for the projection with cymbals, drums and bells and more performed by Little Bang Theory .

Kinugasa’s story tumbles through human misfortune. A man is a janitor in the mental institution where his wife is being treated. Kinugasa pushes the film through the camera with a hard burn of inner turmoil that leaves a breathtakingly expressionistic residue of movement and emotion on screen. Everyone in the story is marked in some way. Little Bang Theory weaves its supple and intricate path through an awe-inspiringly textured soundscape that comes vividly to life through Yamauchi’s words. New diction and new sounds dance with images from the distant past in the immediacy of the Kenilworth 508 Theatre. Too quickly, it passes and the Gigante Theater moves on.


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Presentation by the Gigante Theater of A page of madness only lasted a week. His next show stars Michael Stebbins in Will Eno’s Title and deed 18 Nov-Dec 3. For more information, visit theatregigante.org.

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Japanese Film Festival India Showcases Makoto Shinkai Films At 2022 Event – News https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-festival-india-showcases-makoto-shinkai-films-at-2022-event-news/ Sat, 08 Oct 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://tohoho.info/japanese-film-festival-india-showcases-makoto-shinkai-films-at-2022-event-news/ The festival takes place in Delhi from November 4-6, Mumbai from November 11-13, Chennai from November 25-27 and Bengaluru from December 9-11. The official Facebook page of the Japanese Film Festival in India (JFF) announced on Thursday that he would be the director Makoto Shinkaiit is (grow old with you, susume) is working on its […]]]>

The festival takes place in Delhi from November 4-6, Mumbai from November 11-13, Chennai from November 25-27 and Bengaluru from December 9-11.


The official Facebook page of the Japanese Film Festival in India (JFF) announced on Thursday that he would be the director Makoto Shinkaiit is (grow old with you, susume) is working on its 2022 event, titled “Japan Film & Music Festival.” The festival will take place at PVR Cinemas outlets across India from November 4 to December 11. Tickets go on sale October 19.

The festival will take place at:

  • Delhi November 4-6
  • Bombay from November 11 to 13
  • Chennai Nov 25-27
  • Bangalore from 9 to 11 December

The festival screened the Poupelle of Chimney Town cinema, the Josée, the tiger and the fish animated film and the 4K remaster of the Ramayana: The Legend of Prince Rama animated film in Delhi earlier this year after canceling its previous physical events in Delhi and Bangalore. The JFF aired the reverse patema and Eve Time animated films in India from February 14 to 27 as part of its online festival.

The Japan Foundation annually hosts the Japanese Film Festival (JFF) in major cities across India. The Foundation hosted the JFF 2019 event in Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore, New Delhi, Gurugram, Chennai and Guwahati. The JFF screened films such as children of the sea, garden of words your name., grow old with you, read on the walland live action tokyo ghoul in 2019.

The Japan Foundation established its South Asian chapter in New Delhi in 1994. The Foundation promotes cultural and intellectual exchanges as well as the teaching of the Japanese language abroad.

Source: Indian from the Japanese Film Festival Facebook page


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